King of Tokyo Box Insert

Finished my second game insert, King of Tokyo, with the help of a friend’s laser cutter.

First I mocked up blocks for the different pieces, then I moved things around until I liked the fit, and finally put in walls to finish the floor plan.

After the floor plan was done, I made notches in the base and walls for connections. Then I pulled out out the 4 outer walls, built up them up, then laser cut them with the base and test fit them.

After I had the base and outer walls finished, I started on the internal ones.  It took a few revisions for some of the walls before I got them right.  Finally I designed a cover so the board fits in the middle.  I’m not super happy with how the top cover turned out, but it’s still a step in the right direction.

One interesting thing, the laser makes the foam pull back from the edges.  This isn’t great for long flat contacts, but for joints, it works really well because you can put the tip of your glue into the gap and fill it.

 

I’ve attached the DWG file in case anyone wants to modify or make one them self.

Boardgame Insert!

Castle Dice Insert - 2

Well I’ve gotten into boardgames recently and started going to an almost weekly group called the Janesville Pegheads.

Anyways, I have a few games, and many have terrible inserts and organization.  One of these games is Castle Dice and it’s expansion.  So I watched a few videos on using foamcore and started to do my own.

Pretty good results, but one thing that really bothered me was the bottom dice tray, I miscalculated and thought I could fit all the gold in its spot but I couldn’t so it had to be put in another spot, but it doesn’t make it look that bad because I also have the solo dice in with the land dice so it doesn’t look that out of place to have a solo dice in another spot.

 

I think I might try and design and laser cut the next design, probably for King of Tokyo and some of it’s expansions.

Detroit Makerfaire 2014

I apologize for the mismash of this post, I don’t have a good way to do a huge photodump like this.  Anyways, here are the pics and video I took from Makerfaire Detroit 2014

 

Stuff from Element14

Been busy as of late, not much to report project-wise besides a version of my edge-lit lighted display for my Mom’s B-Day

Beyond that, I got some sweet stickers from Element14 and picked up a few things from the parent company Newark.

http://canada.newark.com/

http://www.newark.com/

 

Here are the Element14 stickers

Element14 and Tesla Stickers

 

 

And the electronic components I picked up

Element14 Swag

 

The electronics include:

 

Basys 2 development board

http://www.digilentinc.com/Products/Detail.cfm?Prod=BASYS2

The Basys 2 development kit is a Spartan3 FPGA development kit.  It’s been a long time since I programmed an FPGA and I’m looking forward to getting back into it.

 

An FPGA differs from a microcontroller as you are reprogramming hardware as opposed to just writing a program for your micro to step through and follow.  An FPGA is made up of repgorammable logic cells, usually look up tables or LUTs.  The code (unless otherwise specified) happens in parallel as opposed to step by step in a microcontroller, though you can specify clock edge actions.  You typically code in VHDL or Verilog.  Back in the day, we also used virtual gates like and, or, and nots which the compiler would churn down into those look up tables just the same as VHDL or Verilog.  It looks like that functionality seems to be by the way-side now, the last time I looked at Xilinx’s software I didn’t see an option to put down gates and wire them.

 

Also a micro HDMI to standard for my Beaglebone Black

http://uk.farnell.com/pro-signal/cdlhd4-micro-018/cable-assy-hdmi-d-m-to-hdmi-a-m/dp/2305808

 

And lastly a jumper kit

http://uk.farnell.com/multicomp/mcbbj65/jumper-wire-assortment-65pcs/dp/2396146

 

I don’t have exact plans for what I’m going to do with the Basys 2, FPGA’s really excel at memory intensive tasks like image and video processing.  Eventually it might be nice to re-do my school project of a resistive touch pad that draws on a monitor connected via VGA, but I might start a bit slower and do a simple combo lock switched in using the slide switches and buttons.  I’ll post the project and code when its finished.

 

Now to prepare for Detroit Makerfaire with Ben Heck!  I’ll make sure to post pics

http://www.makerfairedetroit.com/

 

Homemade CS Go Swag

Ben Heck recently visited a friend from Valve.  He had promised me some cool CS Go swag as I’ve played Counterstrike off and on for many years (since 1.2).  Unfortunately they didn’t have any CS Go swag and we got Portal swag instead, still pretty cool.

 

Well this was our typical tinker-Saturday and I had some new NeoPixels that I got from Sparkfun.  Ben started playing around with them and his acrylics.  He decided to do an edge lit acrylic experiment.  I suggested the CS Go logo so I’d have something cool for my desk.  We found a couple of suitable logos and then Ben edited the best ones into one that would work well for our acrylic.

 

We cut the log on two pieces of acrylic, one clear that appeared to work great for edge lit, and one frosted, which works better to diffuse a backlight.  Ben then 3D printed a base to fit the NeoPixels and the acrylic.  We put them together for some testing and it worked great.  I then took the project home, hooked everything up to my Teensy 2.0 board and modified the code to have a little more functionality so I could switch between the different modes.

 

Here is a video of it in action

 

And here is the Arduino code

NeoPixel data line is Pin2, interrupt is Pin5

#include <Adafruit_NeoPixel.h>

#define PIN 2

// Parameter 1 = number of pixels in strip
// Parameter 2 = Arduino pin number (most are valid)
// Parameter 3 = pixel type flags, add together as needed:
// NEO_KHZ800 800 KHz bitstream (most NeoPixel products w/WS2812 LEDs)
// NEO_KHZ400 400 KHz (classic ‘v1′ (not v2) FLORA pixels, WS2811 drivers)
// NEO_GRB Pixels are wired for GRB bitstream (most NeoPixel products)
// NEO_RGB Pixels are wired for RGB bitstream (v1 FLORA pixels, not v2)
Adafruit_NeoPixel strip = Adafruit_NeoPixel(8, PIN, NEO_GRB + NEO_KHZ800);

// IMPORTANT: To reduce NeoPixel burnout risk, add 1000 uF capacitor across
// pixel power leads, add 300 – 500 Ohm resistor on first pixel’s data input
// and minimize distance between Arduino and first pixel. Avoid connecting
// on a live circuit…if you must, connect GND first.

volatile unsigned int mode;
volatile boolean superBreakout;

void setup() {
strip.begin();
mode = 0;
superBreakout = 0;
pinMode(5, INPUT);
digitalWrite(5, HIGH);
clearWipe();
strip.show(); // Initialize all pixels to ‘off’
delay(50);
attachInterrupt(0, changeMode, FALLING);
}

void loop() {

if ( digitalRead(5) == HIGH){
superBreakout = 0;
}

switch (mode){

case 0:
// Some example procedures showing how to display to the pixels:
colorWipe(strip.Color(255, 0, 0), 50); // Red
colorWipe(strip.Color(0, 255, 0), 50); // Green
colorWipe(strip.Color(0, 0, 255), 50); // Blue
// Send a theater pixel chase in…
// Send a theater pixel chase in…
theaterChase(strip.Color(127, 127, 127), 50); // White
theaterChase(strip.Color(127, 0, 0), 50); // Red
theaterChase(strip.Color( 0, 127, 0), 50); // Green
theaterChase(strip.Color( 0, 0, 127), 50); // Blue
// Send rainbow code
rainbow(20);
rainbowCycle(20);
theaterChaseRainbow(50);
break;

case 1:
// Some example procedures showing how to display to the pixels:
colorWipe(strip.Color(255, 0, 0), 50); // Red
colorWipe(strip.Color(0, 255, 0), 50); // Green
colorWipe(strip.Color(0, 0, 255), 50); // Blue
break;

case 2:
// Send a theater pixel chase in…
theaterChase(strip.Color(127, 127, 127), 50); // White
theaterChase(strip.Color(127, 0, 0), 50); // Red
theaterChase(strip.Color( 0, 127, 0), 50); // Green
theaterChase(strip.Color( 0, 0, 127), 50); // Blue
break;

case 3:
// Send rainbow code
rainbow(50);
rainbowCycle(25);
theaterChaseRainbow(50);
break;

case 4:
rainbow(50);
break;

case 5:
rainbowCycle(25);
break;

case 6:
theaterChaseRainbow(50);
break;

case 7:
clearWipe();
strip.show(); // Initialize all pixels to ‘off’
break;

case 8:
mode = 0;
break;
}

}

void changeMode(){
if (superBreakout == 0){
mode++;
clearWipe();
strip.show(); // Initialize all pixels to ‘off’
superBreakout = 1;
while(digitalRead(5) == LOW);
}
}

void clearWipe(){
for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++){
strip.setPixelColor(i,strip.Color(0,0,0));
}
}

// Fill the dots one after the other with a color
void colorWipe(uint32_t c, uint8_t wait) {
for(uint16_t i=0; i<strip.numPixels(); i++) {
strip.setPixelColor(i, c);
strip.show();
if (superBreakout)
break;
delay(wait);
}
}

void rainbow(uint8_t wait) {
uint16_t i, j;

for(j=0; j<256; j++) {
for(i=0; i<strip.numPixels(); i++) {
strip.setPixelColor(i, Wheel((i+j) & 255));
}
strip.show();
if (superBreakout)
break;
delay(wait);
}
}

// Slightly different, this makes the rainbow equally distributed throughout
void rainbowCycle(uint8_t wait) {
uint16_t i, j;

for(j=0; j<256*5; j++) { // 5 cycles of all colors on wheel
for(i=0; i< strip.numPixels(); i++) {
strip.setPixelColor(i, Wheel(((i * 256 / strip.numPixels()) + j) & 255));
}
strip.show();
if (superBreakout)
break;
delay(wait);
}
}

//Theatre-style crawling lights.
void theaterChase(uint32_t c, uint8_t wait) {
for (int j=0; j<10; j++) { //do 10 cycles of chasing
for (int q=0; q < 3; q++) {
for (int i=0; i < strip.numPixels(); i=i+3) {
strip.setPixelColor(i+q, c); //turn every third pixel on
}
strip.show();
if (superBreakout)
break;
delay(wait);

for (int i=0; i < strip.numPixels(); i=i+3) {
strip.setPixelColor(i+q, 0); //turn every third pixel off
}
}
}
}

//Theatre-style crawling lights with rainbow effect
void theaterChaseRainbow(uint8_t wait) {
for (int j=0; j < 256; j++) { // cycle all 256 colors in the wheel
for (int q=0; q < 3; q++) {
for (int i=0; i < strip.numPixels(); i=i+3) {
strip.setPixelColor(i+q, Wheel( (i+j) % 255)); //turn every third pixel on
}
strip.show();
if (superBreakout)
break;
delay(wait);

for (int i=0; i < strip.numPixels(); i=i+3) {
strip.setPixelColor(i+q, 0); //turn every third pixel off
}
}
}
}

// Input a value 0 to 255 to get a color value.
// The colours are a transition r – g – b – back to r.
uint32_t Wheel(byte WheelPos) {
if(WheelPos < 85) {
return strip.Color(WheelPos * 3, 255 – WheelPos * 3, 0);
} else if(WheelPos < 170) {
WheelPos -= 85;
return strip.Color(255 – WheelPos * 3, 0, WheelPos * 3);
} else {
WheelPos -= 170;
return strip.Color(0, WheelPos * 3, 255 – WheelPos * 3);
}
}

Components

Teensy 2.0 – https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12765

NeoPixel – https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12661

Ben Heck Reflow Oven

Many months ago I worked on a reflow oven at Ben Heck’s shop over a couple of weekends.  It worked out pretty well and he included it in an episode

I used a toaster oven, two thermocouples and readers, one of Ben’s homemade Arduino boards, an LCD screen, and a solid state relay.

Many of the parts can be found from the distributor Newark http://www.newark.com/ or http://canada.newark.com/

SSR –  http://www.newark.com/opto-22/240d10/ssr-panel-mount-280vac-32vdc-10a/dp/96F1061
Thermocouple reader –  http://www.adafruit.com/products/269
Thermocouples  – http://www.omega.com/pptst/5TC.html
Arduino – http://www.newark.com/arduino/a000073/dev-brd-atmega328-arduino-uno/dp/63W3545
LCD – http://www.newark.com/powertip/pc1602ars-cwa-a-q/display-alphanumeric-16-x-2/dp/05M0978

For the toaster oven, look at rummage sales or resale stores. The dumber the interface the easier it is to take over with a solid state relay instead, and you definitely want a top and bottom element for more even circuit board heating. I’ve heard of issues with reflow ovens with only one.

For modifying the profiles-

int profile[4][6] = {
{
75,140,45,125,205,20 }
,
{
75,140,45,125,205,20 }
,
{
75,140,45,125,205,20 }
,
{
75,140,45,125,205,20 }
};
String profileNames[4] = {
“Ol’ Fashioned Pb”, “New Fangled RoHS”, “Profile 3 “, “Profile 4 ”
};

The format of the profiles is:

{Ramp 1 0-255, 1st target temp, hold seconds at 1st target, Ramp 2, 2nd target temp, hold seconds at 2nd target}

Ramp rate is kind of a misnomer, its just the analog write value but because our relay is a zero cross and we aren’t accounting for the cross, it doesn’t exactly work as good as a PWM value would.

 

The ROHS profile definitely needs changing, probably a 220 target. Your results may vary but you will definitely have to tweak for your own oven and possibly it could change depending on your board as well.

 

Attached at the end of the post is the code.  For more discussion on the project or for links to Ben’s wooden cut panel, go to the thread on the Element14 forums

http://www.element14.com/community/docs/DOC-65496/l/episode-116-bens-home-brew-solder-reflow-oven-20-episode

 

Arduino code:

Reflow Oven Code